This site uses cookies. Learn more about cookies.

Close cookie details

OverDrive would like to use cookies to store information on your computer to improve your user experience at our Website. One of the cookies we use is critical for certain aspects of the site to operate and has already been set. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but this could affect certain features or services of the site. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, click here to see our Privacy Policy.

If you do not wish to continue, please click here to exit this site.

Hide notification

  Main Nav

A Dual Inheritance

Cover of A Dual Inheritance

A Dual Inheritance

A Novel
Borrow Borrow

For readers of Rules of Civility and The Marriage Plot, Joanna Hershon's A Dual Inheritance is an engrossing novel of passion, friendship, betrayal, and class--and their reverberations across generations.

Autumn 1962: Ed Cantowitz and Hugh Shipley meet in their final year at Harvard. Ed is far removed from Hugh's privileged upbringing as a Boston Brahmin, yet his drive and ambition outpace Hugh's ambivalence about his own life. These two young men form an unlikely friendship, bolstered by a fierce shared desire to transcend their circumstances. But in just a few short years, not only do their paths diverge--one rising on Wall Street, the other becoming a kind of global humanitarian--but their friendship ends abruptly, with only one of them understanding why.

Can a friendship define your view of the world? Spanning from the Cuban Missile Crisis to the present-day stock market collapse, with locations as diverse as Dar es Salaam, Boston, Shenzhen, and Fishers Island, A Dual Inheritance asks this question, as it follows not only these two men, but the complicated women in their vastly different lives. And as Ed and Hugh grow farther and farther apart, they remain uniquely--even surprisingly--connected.

Advance praise for A Dual Inheritance

"This brilliant family saga captured me from its opening lines and kept me pinned to the couch--by turns laughing and sobbing--until I'd reached its stunning, satisfying conclusion. It calls to mind The Corrections and The Emperor's Children, as well as Cheever and Michener and Potok, but this is also a novel squarely in the tradition of Victorian social realism, of Eliot and Galsworthy and Dickens. And like those novels, A Dual Inheritance is a cracking story--populated with complicated, fascinating characters and fueled by surprising turns of plot--but it's also a deft analysis of class and race in America. With it, Joanna Hershon establishes herself as one of the most important storytellers of the new millennium."--Joanna Smith Rakoff, author of A Fortunate Age

"A Dual Inheritance is deep and beautiful and humane. It has a massive scope and a social conscience, and yet is also incredibly intimate. What an accomplished novel; it truly took my breath away."--Jennifer Gilmore, author of Something Red

"Joanna Hershon gives further evidence of a pleasing trend set off by Jonathan Franzen's Freedom and Jeffrey Eugenides's The Marriage Plot: big books about American politics, social customs, and family dynamics that seek to update and relocate the brilliantly compelling English nineteenth-century novel. I envy and admire Hershon's ability to so convincingly display the complex intimacies of multigenerational love and friendship. This is a book to lose yourself in."--Antonya Nelson, author of Bound

"This insightful, worldly, and engaging novel, at once intimate and broad in scope, traverses continents and decades while hewing closely to the psychological shadings of its characters. A rueful comedy of entitlement and chagrin, it says volumes about the way we live now."--Phillip Lopate, author of Getting Personal

For readers of Rules of Civility and The Marriage Plot, Joanna Hershon's A Dual Inheritance is an engrossing novel of passion, friendship, betrayal, and class--and their reverberations across generations.

Autumn 1962: Ed Cantowitz and Hugh Shipley meet in their final year at Harvard. Ed is far removed from Hugh's privileged upbringing as a Boston Brahmin, yet his drive and ambition outpace Hugh's ambivalence about his own life. These two young men form an unlikely friendship, bolstered by a fierce shared desire to transcend their circumstances. But in just a few short years, not only do their paths diverge--one rising on Wall Street, the other becoming a kind of global humanitarian--but their friendship ends abruptly, with only one of them understanding why.

Can a friendship define your view of the world? Spanning from the Cuban Missile Crisis to the present-day stock market collapse, with locations as diverse as Dar es Salaam, Boston, Shenzhen, and Fishers Island, A Dual Inheritance asks this question, as it follows not only these two men, but the complicated women in their vastly different lives. And as Ed and Hugh grow farther and farther apart, they remain uniquely--even surprisingly--connected.

Advance praise for A Dual Inheritance

"This brilliant family saga captured me from its opening lines and kept me pinned to the couch--by turns laughing and sobbing--until I'd reached its stunning, satisfying conclusion. It calls to mind The Corrections and The Emperor's Children, as well as Cheever and Michener and Potok, but this is also a novel squarely in the tradition of Victorian social realism, of Eliot and Galsworthy and Dickens. And like those novels, A Dual Inheritance is a cracking story--populated with complicated, fascinating characters and fueled by surprising turns of plot--but it's also a deft analysis of class and race in America. With it, Joanna Hershon establishes herself as one of the most important storytellers of the new millennium."--Joanna Smith Rakoff, author of A Fortunate Age

"A Dual Inheritance is deep and beautiful and humane. It has a massive scope and a social conscience, and yet is also incredibly intimate. What an accomplished novel; it truly took my breath away."--Jennifer Gilmore, author of Something Red

"Joanna Hershon gives further evidence of a pleasing trend set off by Jonathan Franzen's Freedom and Jeffrey Eugenides's The Marriage Plot: big books about American politics, social customs, and family dynamics that seek to update and relocate the brilliantly compelling English nineteenth-century novel. I envy and admire Hershon's ability to so convincingly display the complex intimacies of multigenerational love and friendship. This is a book to lose yourself in."--Antonya Nelson, author of Bound

"This insightful, worldly, and engaging novel, at once intimate and broad in scope, traverses continents and decades while hewing closely to the psychological shadings of its characters. A rueful comedy of entitlement and chagrin, it says volumes about the way we live now."--Phillip Lopate, author of Getting Personal

Available formats-
  • OverDrive MP3 Audiobook
  • OverDrive WMA Audiobook
Subjects-
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    1
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
  • Lexile:
  • Interest Level:
  • Reading Level:

Recommended for you


Excerpts-
  • From the book

    Chapter One

    Fall

    Had he described Hugh Shipley at all over the past three years, approachable would not have been a word he'd ever have used. But one warm autumn night during his senior year, Ed Cantowitz found himself grabbing Hugh Shipley's arm in front of Lamont Library the way he might otherwise grab a Budweiser at Cronin's. They were not friends; they'd spoken only in passing this year, and mostly after the Shakespeare seminar in which they were both enrolled, but Ed Cantowitz was not thinking of how Hugh Shipley might find him ­off-­putting or offensive, because, as usual, Ed Cantowitz was thinking about himself.

    "Keep walking," muttered Ed, and ­that's what Hugh Shipley did. He walked as if he ­hadn't even noticed the interruption, ­didn't so much as slow the trajectory of his cigarette from hand to mouth. Ed watched the cigarette and the dry fallen leaves on the ­ground--­anything not to turn around and stare at the girl. "Do me a favor and keep walking and don't turn around. Do yourself a favor and just look straight ahead."

    Shipley nodded. "Might want to take your hand off my arm," and Ed released his grip before offering a crazed smile as an afterthought, if not an apology. He knew he had a menacing voice, not to mention truly dark stubble (he'd forgone his ­much-­needed second shave of the day), and his husky voice and bulldog build lent him not only an unsavory but even vaguely criminal air. Ed usually alternated between being pleased by these qualities and ashamed, but at the moment he was so focused he ­didn't care what Shipley thought. The two young men walked down steps and past a stand of pine trees, kicking crabapples out of their path, and Ed talked. "This girl," he said, and Shipley nodded again. Ed ­didn't sound embarrassed, because he ­wasn't embarrassed. This, he believed, is what men did for one another, all kinds of men, he ­didn't care who; in the face of beautiful women, men were allied soldiers, at least until proven otherwise. "I can't stop staring at this girl, but I'm under no illusions that I don't need strategy. You? You don't know a thing about strategy, am I right? Because you don't need it. I need ­strategy--­and make no mistake about it, strategy does ­work--­but when I held open the door for that girl just ­then, I knew if I let myself do something about her, it would have been the wrong thing. I needed to save myself from myself, as they say. Listen, can you tell me if she's still there behind us? Petite girl, big ­eyes--­she's actually kind of ­cross-­eyed--­really ­really ­really nice knockers?"

    Hugh Shipley looked slyly right behind them. He reported that he no longer saw the girl. ­"Hadn't noticed she was ­cross-­eyed."

    "Slightly," said Ed, stopping suddenly, short of breath. "Only if you look closely."

    "Well," said Hugh, "glad to help." He sounded sincere, but Ed knew he might have missed the sarcastic edge. It ­wouldn't have been the first time. Ed was not a ­nerd--­no, ­sir--­but at this point in his college career, he had to acknowledge that he ­was--­to put it ­kindly--­an outsider. Being at ease around groups of other ­people--­especially ­lighthearted other ­people--­was not his strong suit.

    He'd barely spoken to Shipley in the three years they'd been classmates; they'd had no reason to speak. Ed was on scholarship and was a rigorous and nakedly ambitious student with a government concentration and a gift for statistics. He was preparing to write his senior thesis on how China would dominate the...

About the Author-
  • Joanna Hershon is the author of The German Bride, The Outside of August, and Swimming. She has received fellowships from Bread Loaf Writers' Conference and from the Edward Albee Foundation. An adjunct professor at Columbia, where she teaches creative writing, she lives in Brooklyn with her husband, the painter Derek Buckner, and their twin sons.

Title Information+
  • Publisher
    Books on Tape
  • OverDrive MP3 Audiobook
    Release date:
  • OverDrive WMA Audiobook
    Release date:
Digital Rights Information+
  • OverDrive MP3 Audiobook
    Burn to CD: 
    Permitted
    Transfer to device: 
    Permitted
    Transfer to Apple® device: 
    Permitted
    Public performance: 
    Not permitted
    File-sharing: 
    Not permitted
    Peer-to-peer usage: 
    Not permitted
    All copies of this title, including those transferred to portable devices and other media, must be deleted/destroyed at the end of the lending period.
    OverDrive WMA Audiobook
    Burn to CD: 
    Not permitted
    Transfer to device: 
    Permitted (3 times)
    Transfer to Apple® device: 
    Permitted
    Public performance: 
    Not permitted
    File-sharing: 
    Not permitted
    Peer-to-peer usage: 
    Not permitted
    All copies of this title, including those transferred to portable devices and other media, must be deleted/destroyed at the end of the lending period.

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Bookshelf to manage your titles.

×

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Bookshelf?

×

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You have reached the maximum number of titles you are permitted to recommend at this time.

×

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend your library consider adding this title to the Digital Collection.

×
×

×

To recommend A Dual Inheritance, complete the following information:

*indicates required information

(comma separates multiple email addresses, i.e. bob@aol.com, bob@hotmail.com)

Subject: Check out this downloadable title at the Deschutes Public Library


We respect your privacy. Any and all information collected at this site will be kept strictly confidential and will not be sold, reused, rented, loaned, or otherwise disclosed.

×
Recommend this title to the library to be added to the Digital Collection
A Dual Inheritance
A Dual Inheritance
A Novel
Joanna Hershon
×
Buy it now
and help our library WIN!
A Dual Inheritance
A Dual Inheritance
A Novel
Joanna Hershon
Choose a retail partner below to buy this title for yourself.
A portion of this purchase goes to support your library.
×
×

To recommend '', complete the following information:

*indicates required information

(comma separates multiple email addresses, i.e. bob@aol.com, bob@hotmail.com)

Subject: Check out this downloadable title at the Deschutes Public Library

We respect your privacy. Any and all information collected at this site will be kept strictly confidential and will not be sold, reused, rented, loaned, or otherwise disclosed.

×